Inspiring and fun interviews coming soon!

By Jessica Militello

When I first started extraeclectic, I wasn’t exactly sure if the site would only include self-improvement editorial types of articles, or if I would also include feature articles and Q&A’s, similar to my published work. Mostly the reason that I was unsure of doing this was because I was afraid that if I was reaching out to different people, business owners, etc. to interview them that because it was going on my own website and not a publication that perhaps it wouldn’t be worth their time.

As a freelance writer of around two years, I was also afraid that by doing feature articles to publish on my own site, that somehow, because my site is fairly new, does not have a ton of traffic (yet), and I’m still in the progress phase of growing my site through traffic and eventually advertisers, that I was a failure to be doing the same work for free that I am used to getting paid for. But if you notice, many of the things that I just mentioned all involve worries, doubts, and negative self-talk which are normal to have and that is okay. What is not okay is allowing those fears to be a reason to not do something that I believe in. With continued dedication, consistency, and research, I do believe my dream of creating a supportive community on my site and helping to inspire others to pursue their dreams can gain traction-but it will not be an overnight thing.

Needless to say, so far 2021 isn’t exactly much different from 2020. And no one really knows exactly when life will go back to “normal,” as we keep talking about since last March. I decided that perhaps now is as good a time as any to put into practice the same thing that I try to inspire people to do when I write articles on whoever I find is pursuing their dream.

And so, most recently I have been speaking different individuals, artists, business owners, anyone that I think has a really interesting story to inspire, help, entertain, and share great information and advice for readers to be informed and inspired to pursue their passion. I can’t wait to share these with you!

What is something you want to do, but feel afraid to try? How did it feel when there was something that you kept putting to the side and when you finally gave it a try? Tell me your experiences in the comments!

Do people treat you how they feel about you?

Do others really show you how much they value you?

By Jessica Militello

I see a lot of quotes floating around social media like, “how they treat you is how they feel about you,” “how much effort they put in is how valuable you are to them,” “you teach people how valuable you are,” and another one that floats around to the effect of, “I’ve seen people who can’t communicate/commit/ whatever for one and do it for another” and once again corelate it to how “valuable” they find you or how “serious” they are about you, and I am here to tell you that this one-dimensional, black and white thinking could not be further from the truth.

Additionally, what is all of this focus on what other people think of you or how much they value you and why do you give a fuck? What do you think of you? How much do you value yourself, because when you think highly of yourself and know your worth and intrinsic value, and when you carefully curate your own thoughts and the people who you allow in your life you will be more focused on whether how they are treating you is meeting your standards, and if they don’t-no sweat, because you know what you want and deserve for your life, and you treat yourself so well that when someone doesn’t measure up there is no wondering of why and how much they really value you. There are no questions period because you value yourself so much that you will not accept behavior that is less than the way you treat and talk to yourself.

Pay more attention to how you feel about you because when you look to others and whether they value you to determine how you should feel about yourself, your cup will always be empty. You will always be waiting for someone, anyone to give you just a drop to roll around in your cup-it will always be empty. Know your value, know your worth-because when you feel good about you, I can guarantee-the people that add to that feeling will be in your life, and the people who drain you and make you question yourself will not even be allowed in your life to begin with. Even if that means being lonely for a while until you find your people, it will be worth it because you know what you deserve.

And as a second point to the whole theory of how others treat you and what it means-change happens on a scale of 5 steps-I actually wrote about it in another article. A person, job, popularity, whatever, can not magically make a person go through the five steps of change especially if it involves undoing a behavior or thought pattern that they have been carrying with them for most of their life.

People don’t wake up one day and magically change-change is fucking hard and is a constant commitment. An individual must first observe patterns and behaviors in themselves that are problematic and constantly work on improvement. Another person’s kindness, beauty, success is not a magic wand to create a complete personality transplant in another. People treat you how they feel about themselves. Another person cannot value you if they don’t even value themselves.

Have you ever been that relative/friend/girlfriend/spouse, who was super loyal, loving, and kind to another and no matter how much you gave it was never enough? Yes? Have you also ever in your life had a relative/friend/spouse, whatever at a time in your life when you did not have a good relationship with yourself and no matter what they did or how much they cared it was never enough? And was it ever because THEY were the ones that didn’t have value? No-of course not-maybe you were too guarded, too immature, or were just not introspective enough with yourself to appreciate it or value it. Maybe someone was so good to you but because you felt so badly about yourself you just couldn’t believe it and you questioned every kind word and gesture and pushed them away only to later regret it.

Let’s face it-we’ve all been on both sides of it, but if you think about it objectively it was never because you or they did not have value or because you were not worth the effort-what did it all have to do with? Your thoughts and your relationship with yourself.

Trust me, I have lived in the prison of gauging my value with how others have treated me-it was draining. I held on to unhealthy friendships and relationships that weren’t even meeting my needs but I put them over myself because I did not have any self-worth. If I dated someone and they treated me like gold in the beginning only for the effort and kindness to diminish, I blamed myself or worried that they somehow discovered the “big secret” that I was not worthy of love. Instead of folding, I only tried harder. It makes me sad to think of how hard I would try because I could not see myself clearly. But I am also grateful for it all because had I not gotten to the point of getting hurt over and over because of my lack of self-worth, I would have never learned that there was a different way that involves healing myself and giving myself all of the things that I have spent my life looking outwardly for the answers.

It sounds corny and a little cliché, but everything you’re looking for is already within you. You just have to clear out the bullshit you’ve been taught your whole life about your worthiness and stop looking to others to how valuable you are or why you supposedly weren’t “worth” their time.

You are worthy, you are valuable-but the only person you need to prove that to is yourself, otherwise you wouldn’t be looking at others to tell you what you’re worth; no one can do that for you, only you can.

What are some beliefs that you are holding onto about yourself? How are these ideas serving you, how are they holding you back? What would it look like if you always had your back? How can you give yourself some of the things that you are looking for in others? Share some of your thoughts in the comments.

How to start setting boundaries

It’s never too late to change your life

By Jessica Militello

Honestly I didn’t even know how to start this article. It’s one I’ve wanted to write for a long time but the brutal honesty of it all made me want to avoid sharing it and I also felt like a fraud doling out advice on something I’m still learning about.

I grew up in a home where there was always so much drama going on involving other people, that I learned my role and the way to be lovable was to keep my feelings and thoughts to myself; that other, way worse things were going on, and I couldn’t possibly ask my primary caretakers for help because it was selfish to “need” anything when there was already so much chaos going on.

I learned to be their caretakers, in a sense, from a young age. They couldn’t even get their own shit together- in my young mind, I needed to learn how to take care of myself. Through observing these relationship dynamics, I learned to stay quiet, put other people’s thoughts and feelings before mine, and to basically be invisible. The few times I did try to speak up in those instances, my feelings were often dismissed or minimized, followed by being shamed for having those feelings.

Throughout my life, before learning about all this and doing the healing work to grow from it, naturally, all of these patterns and behaviors I observed growing up played out in all my relationships. I didn’t trust my instincts because I would often dismiss my own feelings in light of someone else’s, struggled to communicate when I felt uncomfortable or wanted to say no to things, constantly felt guilty if/when I would put my own needs first, settled for poor behavior and careless treatment and justified it by worrying about what they were “going through” at the time, or told myself they probably didn’t mean it or that I was just being too sensitive or some other jedi mental gymnastics reasoning to blame myself for their poor behavior. And because I constantly struggled to communicate my own thoughts and dismissed my own feelings, I landed in relationships and friendships with people who did the exact same thing to me. I would hold onto resentment and in many times get to a point where holding in my thoughts resulted in me getting mad and lashing out at the other person for boundaries and communication that I struggled to convey.

Learning to have boundaries is a multi-step process- but there are steps you can take to get you headed in the right direction that you can totally get started on by yourself. So grab a notebook and a pen and let’s get started.

Observe the origin story of your lack of boundaries by reflecting on what you were taught growing up

I realize this first bullet point may be difficult because it is asking you to honestly look at a portion of your life that you may have spent many, many years minimizing or diluting your true thoughts and feelings on. But this first part is really crucial in realizing why you have certain patterns. This helps for having empathy for yourself and understanding in a non-judgmental way, why you are the way you are up to this point in your life. I really don’t need you to dig super deep on this one. If a lot of feelings are coming up on having to reflect on childhood memories, what could be helpful is recollecting on it from a third-person point of view in order for it to feel less heavy. How did the adults in your family talk to each other, what happened when someone made a mistake, or someone’s feelings got hurt? How did communicating take place or not? How were disagreements and arguments resolved? Was there talking it out, listening to each other’s feelings, any apologizing? Did everyone just pretend it didn’t happen and swept everything under the rug? Whatever you remember, or think may be important-write it down. It’s important to make sense of how your inner critic has been developed from your entire life, so if you minimize and judge your own thoughts and feelings, it is most likely because it is what you observed and eventually learned how to treat yourself/others. Again, I don’t need you getting super deep on this especially if you don’t want to. We don’t need to delve into every memory and feeling from the past, we’re just trying to get an idea of where these ideas originated from.

Taking an honest look at your own relationships

Now that you’ve objectively looked at what patterns you observed growing up, it’s time to look at your own friendships/relationships. Are there any that immediately stand out? Dynamics of past/present relationships where you hold resentment for things you did for a person, or feel depleted and used? Any kind of relationship that you look back on where you felt your voice was not heard, your feelings didn’t matter, or where the other person just took and took and then left you on the side of the proverbial highway? As life and relationship coach Mark Groves says, “you are part of the dance.” And as I like to say-the only way someone can waste your time is if you give them your time in the first place. Any relationships where I’ve held resentment of all I did or sacrificed without getting equal effort and consideration in return was because I chose to put that person and their feelings above my own or I chose to constantly give in order to “prove” my value. If I felt I constantly gave and they mostly took, it is because I lacked the self-worth at the time to realize there is never anything you need to do to prove your value or necessity in their life. It can also reflect overcompensating for your abandonment issues by trying to prove how useful you are. This is a self-worth issue which plays into boundary setting, because if you have no self-worth then you can’t set boundaries, but when you have no boundaries, you’re going to have a hell of a time building any self-worth. It’s a vicious cycle. Realize the roles you both played in these friendships/relationships-forgive yourself, forgive them. Look at it as a learning experience and then realize how dynamics you learned growing up played out in these adult relationships of yours. It’s always good to look at any relationships, past or present, reflect on what was good and bad about it, what you did best, and what you would like to work on about yourself. Your relationships with others can only get better when the relationship with yourself improves. If you don’t like yourself, you will constantly be flattered by any validation or attention you get from others. You will accept any relationships/friendships because when you have no self-worth you have minimal standards for the way others treat you because you are desperate for any kind of belonging. But now that you know this, you totally have the chance to turn it around.

Build your self-worth

As I wrote just a few sentences ago, when you have low self-worth you will struggle to have boundaries. When it’s more important to be liked, you will settle for a lot of nonsense. Speak your truth, communicate how you really feel without worrying about scaring a person away, stop saying yes to things you don’t want to do. Stop being afraid of what will happen when you show your true self to others-you know what will happen? The people meant for your life will stay, and the others will fall away. You have to learn to like yourself and enjoy your own company so that you don’t even allow people in your life who cannot meet simple standards of respect and consideration.

Learn what your standards and non-negotiables are for your relationships

A lot of this is all inter-connected and I don’t really see it as a matter of consecutive steps, which is why I didn’t number any of these points. You do need to first realize your intrinsic value to even be able to set standards, but having standards and sticking to them builds self-worth, so it all builds together. What are the standards that you have for yourself? Write them down. Sometimes it just goes back to the golden rule; treat others the way you would like to be treated, but also don’t allow yourself to be treated in any way that you would not treat others.

People are not mind readers-you still need to communicate

In the early stages of learning about boundaries, there can be a tendency to go to extremes in order to make up for a boundary-less past. You may know what you want and deserve, but struggle with feeling defensiveness and forecasting of your feelings being minimized. Setting boundaries doesn’t mean everyone will magically fall in line. This is the hard part because sometimes people who you really want to meet your standards may falter. Communication is extremely important. Everything is not personal, and we can’t just assume what we think others should know. This is the time to have a conversation in a very objective, fact-based way by noting a pattern and how it makes you feel, an openness for discourse, as well as a suggestion or solution. But if they completely dismiss and invalidate your feelings then that is more so where the red flag lies. Adjust accordingly. You might have the best of times with someone but they are just unable to meet you where you are. They may not be in the phase of change to even acknowledge it or do something about it. You have to know your worth and when others act or fail to act in a way that is hurtful and just not okay to you. Sometimes you have to distance yourself, and in some cases if things are unhealthy, end the friendship/relationship. It’s not always easy, but you have to know your worth and your non-negotiables as well as stick to them.

Are you learning more about setting boundaries? What has worked for you so far? Share some of your experiences in boundary setting in the comments.

Can People Change?

 When they want to, have a plan to, and a discipline to stick to it

By Jessica Militello

We try to implement new habits and hobbies, or see a motivational quote that inspires us only temporarily, or we see statements about others, suggesting what they didn’t do for you, they easily will do for the next person, or if they took you seriously enough, they would have changed, and if they didn’t change for you and they did with someone else it’s because of how they felt about you. With such one-dimensional quotes out there about our relationships and overly simplified advice on change it’s no wonder we judge ourselves for not being able to improve overnight, or why we think others can just magically change for us based on our own expectations and projections.

Well first of all, people treat you how they feel about themselves, not how they feel about you. And secondly you are not magical- not to change yourself quickly and simply, or for your worth or perceived lack of it to make someone go through the five steps of change all the way to the maintenance phase and continue it.

Wait- five steps? Don’t people just easily and magically transform for a job or a person like these stupid quotes say? Well who am I to tell anyone what to believe, but the next time you wonder why you can’t simply change your thoughts and habits almost overnight, or if your worth can magically transform someone else’s, let’s go over the five steps to change to even see what it takes for change to occur.

  1. Precontemplation- Before you even begin trying to change something you need to have some kind of thoughts that recognize that your behaviors are somehow not conducive to your best self. Let’s start with something simple- Every time you go out with your friends on a Friday night for dinner, you end up ordering drinks, staying out until 3 in the morning, and you realize that every time you do this, the next day when you wake up for work, you feel tired, hung over, sick, moody, and it feels like the longest day ever. That is as far as precontemplation goes. And the next week despite knowing all this, you do it again anyway because you’ve only got as far as pondering that perhaps this isn’t working for you, but you aren’t ready to change. Notice this all has to do with you, how you feel, what you think, what choices that you are making, and what’s comfortable and familiar. Okay-great, now for the next step.

2. Contemplation- This step involves considering different options or ways to go about what you were in precontemplation over. These phases do not necessarily go on any kind of trajectory either. You can be in precontemplation over something for years and never go further. But staying with our Friday night example, you may recognize you are not 21 years old anymore, your hangovers take a bit longer to recover from, you look and feel like complete shit the next day, and you realize that this kind of living is not working for you. In this step, you may consider having this kind of outing on a Saturday night instead since you are off from work on Sundays. You may consider drinking less or going home earlier, or perhaps not doing something like this every single weekend, but again you still have not acted upon it, these are all just thoughts that are beginning to swirl around in your mind.

3. Preparation- Okay so Saturday morning you woke up late, hung over, got to work late, fell asleep at your desk, and your boss caught you and you got in a lot of trouble. Your bad habits are affecting more than your beauty sleep; now it’s affecting your work. Something that affects you in a serious way, like getting in trouble at work for example, may make you take your ideas to change a bit more seriously. It could also be an experience that you add to the contemplation box and still do absolutely nothing about because you are just not ready to change your habits. You’ve met up with these friends every Friday for the past 10 years and for whatever reason you just aren’t in a place to make changes. Sometimes what is comfortable and what you’re used to takes precedent over making a change even if you know that the change is for the better. But, for the sake of explaining preparation-you getting in trouble was finally your wake up call, so you decide that next Friday you are definitely going to only have two drinks and go home by midnight.

4. Action- It’s time to follow through on your plan. You told all your friends and yourself the new rules- two drinks max and home by midnight. Your friends say okay, but they give you a hard time about it. But for the first two Fridays you totally stuck with the plan. You woke up on Saturday morning feeling way better and you’re super proud of yourself. But you’re in a group chat and your friends are talking about stories and sharing jokes about things that happened after you left! You feel a little left out and annoyed that your “new rules” are ruining your fun. Well- next Friday you aren’t going to miss out again, plus you’ll just make sure not to put your alarm clock on snooze, so you at least get to work on time. You stay out late, you still hit snooze the next morning, and you still show up to work super late and hung over. So much for step 4- you know this change is good for you but you’re not liking the results so far- back into step 2 of change. See how easy it is to go back on the steps? Imagine something harder like beliefs you were taught your whole life about love, relationships, eating habits, or maintaining a healthy weight. These steps, similar to grieving are not at all linear and can start, stop, restart, and stop again depending on the difficulty of the change and how long you’ve been maintaining the kinds of life or mindset that you are trying to reform.

5. Maintenance- As it would appear from my example, you went through with all the steps, but you were not yet in a place to maintain it. A big part of maintenance is recognizing that what’s best for you is not usually going to have the instant gratification or reward we are generally seeking for making a change. In the Friday night example, you knew what you were doing was not conducive to how you felt and it affected your life, but you had a hard time breaking a habit, and doing what was best for your situation by maintaining the changes, and accepting that missing out on some fun was a bit of a sacrifice for your job, health and happiness. Some models of the steps of change actually consider it a six-part process including relapse because it is completely normal to struggle with maintaining a change.

I wanted to keep my example simple by using the Friday night story, but you can take it and change it to anything. These five steps are not so simple, not only for how others choose to or fail to show up for us, but also for us to have compassion for ourselves for when we struggle with changes we want to make and stagger forward and backward at times. What I like about knowing these five steps is it helps me to be mindful not only with myself, but with others. If changes are this hard to make when we recognize there’s a problem, it would be impossible for someone who has not even started the precontemplation step. On the other side of it, while it’s nice to have empathy for someone else’s struggles to do better as a person, we also need to recognize when their inability to address their own habits and behaviors becomes a detriment to our own well-being. So the next time you are struggling, have compassion for yourself and others, but also recognize if someone is unable to change. People don’t just change when they want to change. Not for a job, a relationship, or anything else. We change when we want to, are ready to, have a plan to, and a dedication and discipline to stick to said plan- save this as a note to self and anyone else too.

Coping with Loneliness in a Pandemic (or just in life in general)

Use your mind for you, not against you

By Jessica Militello

Before all this pandemic stuff descended into our lives, people were already struggling as a society with loneliness. According to a study by Cigna in January 2020, 3 in 5 Americans feel lonely. With the pandemic, most people have struggled with feeling even more isolated.

If the monotony of pandemic life has been bringing you down-please know it is normal to feel lonely, bored, angry, sad, worried about when the fuck this is all going to end, and wanting to return to a normal life.

We may not always be in control of what happens to us, but we can control how we think and feel about it, and take steps to better our situation, at least for the sake of our mental health and peace. In light of my own feelings in dealing with all of this, I thought I could try to help others by compiling a list of actions and ideas to help you to deal with similar feelings, many of which can apply to loneliness in general, whether there’s a pandemic or not.

  1. Acknowledge your feelings, be understanding that this is not a normal time, and have some compassion for yourself

I’m not sure if anyone expected some quick fix “make all your troubles go away” type of article, but if that’s what you’re looking for, it doesn’t exist. It’s okay to just acknowledge everything is fucked up right now. What does denying this do for you? Let me tell you something about pushing feelings down- it doesn’t work. Why? Because all you did was store them away for a later date. You can’t run from yourselves, ladies and gentlemen. There’s an episode of the original Twilight Zone called “Stopover in a Quiet Town,” where a couple find themselves in this perfect-suburbia neighborhood and it is completely empty, creepy as fuck, and they have no idea how they got there and all they want to do is leave wherever the fuck it is that they are. Toward the end of the episode they find a train station, they get on the train and they’re super-excited that they’re escaping this nightmare of a creepy, empty town where there’s no one there, only to lift the shades in their window seat to realize they didn’t actually go anywhere. They thought they were going somewhere because they were moving and guess what? They went in a big ass circle and ended up exactly where they started. Now where am I going with that very long run-on sentence of a story? That is you every time you feel an uncomfortable feeling that you don’t like and don’t want to deal with, so you run from it. It comes out eventually. It spills out when something or someone random upsets you and you flip the fuck out over what may have been frustrating or annoying but wasn’t actually that big of a deal, or when you date someone new but you still carry around the hurt from your last relationship because you pushed it down, and everything you feel in your new relationship, happy or sad scares you, so you run. Feelings are information, they tell you something so you can learn about yourself, grow, and better yourself. There is a lot going on right now in the world in general-A LOT. Which brings me to my next point.

2. Reevaluate the role that social media is playing for you and your thoughts-adjust accordingly.

I have very strong feelings about how stupid and pointless I think it is to spend time curating your life to appear a certain way to not only friends and family, but acquaintances, people who feel neutral about you, exes, and complete fucking strangers, instead of spending the time focusing on yourself and doing things that truly add to your happiness. There is definitely a way to curate your Instagram so that you are getting fun, interesting, and helpful information, but if you are mindlessly scrolling, comparing yourself to others, then I would suggest at least seriously minimizing the amount of time you spend daily on it. I personally deleted my Instagram for almost a year before I got back on, and the way I use it now is so different to the past when I was unhappy with myself and using it when I was bored or seeking validation. There are plenty of apps that can help you with time management with your phone use. You can even set a timer and when it runs out, okay, back to reality-literally. Especially during a pandemic, with increased anxiety, depression, and worry- minding other people’s curated business is not doing anything good for you.

3. Stop waiting for people to reach out to you and throwing a pity party for one when it doesn’t happen

When we feel lonely all of our interactions or lack thereof are put under a microscope thanks to the annoying inner critic in our head that likes to play detective to prove its point to us about how not important and forgotten we really are. Don’t play this game with yourself and then get mad at everyone else for how you made yourself feel. It goes a little something like this- we feel lonely, have critical thoughts about how we aren’t good enough, we think of people that we’d like to talk to, and then when they somehow don’t telepathically see our bat call to reach out, we feel badly and it makes us feel more lonely. What you are looking for is validation from others-validation that you matter, are important, and have value. This is a big fucking mistake because you are putting your worth in the eyes of others. Have you lived on that roller coaster before? I have- when people validated me, I felt amazing, when they didn’t, I felt inadequate and would find other ways to fill my voids. First and foremost, lonely in a pandemic, or just lonely on a Friday night, you have to realize you matter, you are important, and you belong- whether you are spending time by yourself or you’re in a room filled with 20 people. If you don’t feel good about you when you’re alone, those same doubts will be your plus-one at an amazing party (when we’re allowed to have one of those again.) This is something you can evaluate and focus on with that time you freed up from using Instagram so much. However, I’m taking you a bit into the weeds on self-worth, so let me bring you back around to the subject. As soon as you get out of your head about needing other people’s validation- if you’re lonely and want to talk, well, God damn, pick up your phone and text, call, or video chat with a friend. Are they someone who majority of the time answers, reciprocates, and enjoys your conversation? -well, there you go. Listen- there’s a difference between someone who isn’t necessarily the first person to be blowing up your phone with calls and texts, and someone who just feels neutral about you or disinterested. Listen to your gut-you will know the difference. And if you notice that if you never reach out to them, they don’t reach out to you and you have feelings about that, then that’s fine too. This is your life-you are allowed to have thoughts about something and change your mind. You are allowed to think, “hey if I don’t call this person, they never call me, maybe I’ll leave them alone because I don’t like the way it makes me feel.”  And if you never hear from them again- well, there’s your answer. It doesn’t make them a bad person, and it doesn’t mean you don’t matter. It simply is- wish them the best and leave them be. But purposely isolating yourself because you want the ego boost from others to reach out first-NO-so pick up the phone and connect with your friends when you’re craving a chat.

4. Well- you sent that text, made that call, but they just didn’t have time for you at the moment

Uh-oh. Looks like it’s just you and your thoughts again. Now what? Well, since we’re not gonna take this as an excuse to mindlessly scroll on Instagram, maybe it’s time to grab a pen and paper and spend a little time getting to know…… (cue dramatic music) …yourself. I know, I know-sounds so boring, right? I don’t know, does it? When’s the last time you did something like this? Grade school? Never? -Okay, seriously. Make a list of really cool things you always wanted to do, you know- those random passing thoughts that you have from time to time of things you’d like to try but ultimately ignore, like learning a new language, starting that blog, watching that movie that you didn’t get to see when it first came out, starting a garden, listening to that crime podcast you thought sounded interesting, but never listened to. You get the idea here- what about things you enjoyed doing but stopped for any list of reasons? Painting, drawing, dancing? The things you bring up when someone asks what you like to do in your free time that you mention you once did but have some completely bullshit excuse of about why you stopped because you’re too embarrassed to admit that aside from work and other obligations it’s basically fucking nothing? Yeah that stuff. A pandemic can’t stop you from doing any of these things, even if it’s fitness-related, because there are many places offering free outdoor classes, livestreams, and zoom classes too. There’s many options here to keep your mind occupied. What about an event, a time in history, a topic that you were always curious about? Again-podcasts, movies, documentaries, books, and YouTube are available on pretty much every subject.

5. The great outdoors

Sometimes you gotta bring it back to basics. These days people feel a need to be doing the most fun, super exciting “Instagram-able” thing and it’s just not realistic. What did people do with their lives before all this technology and perpetual big-brotherness of watching each other’s lives via our phones? When was the last time you watched the sunset, or got up early enough to watch the sunrise, or the moonrise at night? Go for a bike ride, visit some of your local museums and parks that you never go to, get some binoculars, try some bird-watching, or star gazing, or just take a long walk and say hello to the strangers you pass by. It’s amazing how a small gesture like that can make you feel more connected. Stop and start up a conversation-plenty of people are dying for an in-person connection, and if they don’t reciprocate, that’s okay too-keep it moving.

6. Take care of your mental health

Now some of you aren’t going to want to hear it, but I don’t give a fuck. These are pressing times-therapy can help. We are probably the most accepting generation of actually dealing with, acknowledging, and taking care of our mental health through therapy, whether in-person, via the phone, texting, therapy apps, whatever works for you. The older generations didn’t have this open dialogue and acceptance of talking about and taking care of their mental health. You would never hear friends or family even discussing it to each other let alone over lunch at a restaurant. People are inside a lot, working from home, literally only working then going home, not able to see older or sick family members to reduce risk of getting them sick, out of work, what ever, you know the deal, there’s a lot happening. And if you don’t have a non-judgmental outlet for these thoughts, then please see bullet point 1 again for the result. Talk to a really compassionate, non-judgmental friend or family member,  or a therapist, journal your thoughts (seriously-daily or almost daily journaling has changed my life), but do not keep everything bottled up, or minimize your feelings and judge yourself by saying others have it worse. You’re right, others do have it worse. But if your arm was broken, would you not go to the hospital because other people who are there are suffering more or dying? No- you would get help because you having a broken arm and someone else dying are two completely separate things. Someone else having it worse doesn’t mean you don’t need help. I can give you all the tips and advice to find ways to quell loneliness, but the heavier stuff that you have to deal with is up to you.

I really hope, in the very least, this article helped someone to feel seen, know that they aren’t alone in dealing with loneliness, and have some compassion for themselves in what they’re feeling. It can be unsettling to feel isolated and alone with our thoughts and worries, but you do matter, you aren’t alone, and even though we can’t always control our circumstances, we can control how we choose to handle it. Acknowledge your feelings and take the opportunity to strengthen the relationship you have with yourself so that whether you are alone, with tons of friends, single, or in a relationship, you feel valued, important, and loved, because you already give these things to yourself and other people in your life only enhance that- they are never the sole source or provider of this. Being alone doesn’t cause loneliness, rather our expectations, thoughts, and feelings on being alone causes loneliness. But being around others also doesn’t necessarily make us feel better-it is still our thoughts and feelings about ourselves that will make us feel connected or not. If you don’t feel good about yourself, even with others’ acceptance or love, you will always question it, or it will never feel enough, so no matter what-you always have to work on your self-esteem and self-worth. You may not always feel great about the situation, but at least you know you have tools to help yourself and not feel dependent on anyone else for happiness or value.